To Negotiate, or Not to Negotiate?

At this point in the semester, many seniors have already started their job search process. With that comes extensive research on companies, a deeper understanding of what benefits are, how much money is needed to cover rent and student loan payments, and what a fair salary should be. There is sometimes an unrealistic expectation- “they can’t possibly expect me to take a salary THAT low!”- and sometimes negotiating a salary could be beneficial. Jobipedia once again shares insight from hiring managers, this time from Hersheys and Pitney Bowes, regarding salary negotiations.

The first step is always to do as much research as possible. Determine the cost of living for the area, research the company, and use tools online like salary.com to find an appropriate range of salary expectations. Make sure you don’t set your sights too high so that the company feels offended, and make sure to bring up the discussion in a timely and tactful manner. Moreover, make sure you understand all of the benefits and not just the final number on your paycheck. It’s important to see if the company may also offer insurance, a retirement plan, or flexible scheduling to balance out what they offer to their employees. Other practical tips include:

– Remember, wait until an offer is made before discussing salary negotiation
– Moving quickly. Don’t make it seem like you are buying time or wavering on your decision
– Trying to negotiate in person to prevent any miscommunication
– Being gracious for the opportunity. Out of everyone who applied, they chose you, and that is something to be grateful for
– If you truly feel the salary and benefits aren’t up to par, before you turn down the offer, make sure to evaluate how important this position is to your long-term career goals, not just day-to-day bill paying

For more detail, read here: http://jobipedia.org/Blog/Post?id=how-to-negotiate-an-entry-level-salary-9451

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