Monthly Archives: April 2016

All About the Money

One component of the job search that frustrates many job seekers is determining salary expectations. It’s a fairly common occurrence for employers to request salary requirements as part of the application. Job seekers, however, feel uncomfortable with this because they don’t want to come across as demanding or expecting too much.  That’s why it is essential to do your research in advance and know what you- and the job- are worth!

In the article “How the Pros Research What Your Salary Should Be” on Jobipedia, hiring experts share insight on what they look for when it comes to the financials of hiring someone. They give excellent tips on how to determine what your salary expectations should be. The first point of advice is to “Become familiar with all that is expected for you at this job.” That includes knowing if you will be required to travel, or work outside of typical business hours. You can ask about these things during an interview.  On the other hand, it’s also important to know your skills and experiences, and how they can uniquely contribute to your role within this position.  A second piece of advice is to “Do your research.” There are many websites available that can calculate a reasonable salary based on your education, location, and years of experience.  Last but not least, “Don’t look for a magic number, make a range.”  Give a window of where you absolutely need to be (low end) to what you truly feel you are worth (high end) and understand that the numbers in between are an area of negotiation. Additionally, don’t forget that other benefits will be calculated in, such as insurance or commuter allowance. Giving a range shows potential employers that you are willing to be flexible, but still know what you deserve.

To read all of the recommendations from the hiring experts, please check out the full article at http://jobipedia.org/Blog/Post?id=how-the-pros-research-what-your-salary-should-be-11320

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Top Ten Traits for Job Seekers

As students prepare to graduate and join the workforce, they consistently raise the question: what do employers want to see? What skills ARE employers looking for? Inc.com posted an article last week where contributors from the Young Entrepreneur Council shared the top ten qualities they want their new hires to have.  Although they are commenting from a business perspective, all of these traits are applicable to any major or job-seeker.  Here are a few of the qualities that were mentioned:

  1. Adaptability- be able to not only keep up with trends, but be flexible in how you approach and embrace them.  Employers need to know that you can deal with change appropriately and quickly!
  2. Respectfulness- Everyone, from a new hire to a seasoned employee, should treat each other with respect.  Employers expect everyone on their team to be fair, and accepting of their coworkers’ thoughts and beliefs.
  3. Curiosity- Employers love to see that potential employees embrace the concept of lifelong learning.  By learning new skills and trying new concepts, you’ll be able to be more adaptable- which is another important skill!
  4. Non-verbal communication skills- You know from last week just how important body language is. But also keep in mind that non-verbal communication includes typing an email or in chats.  Make sure what you send cannot be misconstrued!
  5. Empathy- Make sure you believe in the mission of the company or organization, and help others stay focused on the goal so everyone can be successful.

To see what the other five traits are that employers are looking for, check out the article at http://www.inc.com/young-entrepreneur-council/10-non-negotiable-traits-a-new-hire-must-possess.html

Seeing What You’re Not Hearing

LinkedIn is a wonderful source for information. No matter what your industry, chances are there is someone on LinkedIn writing about it. I was so excited to see that, only a few days ago, Dr. Travis Bradberry of TalentSmart wrote an article about body language and how it can totally change a message. Many times, we forget just how much our body language shares about us. That’s why it is essential to be aware of what message our nonverbal cues are sharing. Body language can make a massive difference in how we are perceived during an interview, sales visit, meeting with a supervisor, or a lunch meeting with a coworker. It’s imperative to match your nonverbal message to your verbal message.  Here are a few examples of how body language can change a message:

  1. Arm crossing. A lot of people do this without thinking, but it can have a negative impact on how people perceive you. For example, your supervisor may be sharing an idea to improve a process within the office.  Even though you may think it’s an effective idea and you say so verbally, by crossing your arms you seem more like you’re resistant or opposed to the idea. No one likes mixed messages! If you really want to show you’re interest, lean forward into the conversation.
  2. Standing up straight.  Everyone is told that good posture is important, right? In the workplace, good posture is particularly important. By standing up straight, you’re sharing the visual cue that you’re not afraid to take up space- you are confident in yourself and what you’re doing.
  3. Exaggerated nodding. Giving a sporadic nod during a conversation isn’t all that strange. It shows you are listening and engaged in the topic. However, when you cross the line into nodding at every word, you seem desperate. Excessive nodding makes people believe you are seeking approval even when it is not needed.

Dr. Bradberry gives a few other examples of both positive and negative body language. It is important to know what your nonverbal message is sharing with others, and that is why many career counselors recommend an in-person mock interview or a video mock interview so you can get feedback on the image you project. To see more examples of nonverbal cues, click here: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/great-tricks-reading-peoples-body-language-dr-travis-bradberry?utm_campaign=RoundUp&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=28042831&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_rZ75QGfwCOoA4mdLeNwHMPpHAnd9dXavYwGWmWdkA3uW3jny2jv3dRQLiRkZCJ9HHkbCL9-29BLzY27hN1HYNLeM-Lw&_hsmi=28042831