Monthly Archives: February 2017

Do Not Be Afraid of the Fourth Page of Google!

When searching for internships, there are a variety of websites to peruse. Google was my best friend during my internship search! When I use Google, I usually look at the max up to page 2. My theory always was, “If it’s not on page one, then it’s not worth my time!” Well, I was very, very wrong. Let me lay some background info. I am a Biology/Pre-Vet major and there are very few places I can intern, especially when I am stuck to places close to Philadelphia. So for me, the internship search was a massive process. Not only could I not find many internships, I also found really cool ones … in other states. Due to these circumstances, I was forced to break my usual Google rule. Here’s the part where I learn how wrong I was. I found my current internship on the FOURTH page of my Google search. I was very close to giving up and then I saw the exact thing I was looking for and here I am with a full time internship for Summer 2017. Here’s the lesson: DO NOT BE AFRAID OF THE FOURTH PAGE OF GOOGLE! Exhaust every resource there is out there, because I can guarantee you that there is an internship out there for you! Happy Searching!!!

-Teresa

What Questions Do You Have For Me?

When preparing for an interview, it’s pretty common for job seekers to prepare for the questions that the employer may ask. However, it’s equally important for a job seeker to have questions prepared to ask of the employer.  Of course, there are the standby questions, such as “what is the rest of the hiring process like?” or “what is a typical day here like?”  The time when you ask questions is an essential part of the interview process. It’s an opportunity for you to get to know the company more, and continue making a good impression of the interviewer.  The Forbes Coaches Council developed a list of 11 questions a job seeker should consider asking in order to stand out from the other people being interviewed. Here are a few to start:

  1. What could I accomplish in six months that would really exceed your expectations? Many job seekers ask something along the lines of “what are your expectations of me?” Of course your employer will have expectations for you. This will give you a clearer idea of ways you can take initiative and go above-and-beyond to make a good impression.
  2. What gets you excited to come to work every day?  It’s important to know the culture of your new company, as well as what motivates your new supervisor.  The response to this question can help you determine if you will mesh well with both!
  3. How does your workplace help employees reach their peak potential? Again, it will be a great insight of the company culture to know if they work to help their employees succeed, or adapt with changing needs and times.
  4. What other information can I share with you? This gives the interviewer another door to ask you more questions, and gives you the opportunity to respond to any concerns or doubts they may have.

The Forbes Coaches Council has other great questions you can ask! Check them out here: http://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2016/11/10/11-unusual-question-to-ask-in-an-interview-to-distinguish-yourself-from-the-competition/#68ec588f25f3

Five Facts for your Federal Resume

More and more students are including positions with the federal government as part of their job search. And why not? There are positions for all majors and career paths, they offer great benefits, and every day is different while still having a positive impact on society. However, it’s important to note that when you apply for a federal position, you will need to use a federal resume. The Partnership for Public Service is an excellent resource as you get started in your federal job search. One of their resources is a guide on developing your federal resume.  Here are five tips to get you started:

  1. It’s ok to be longer than one page.  In fact, for an entry-level position, your resume could run anywhere from two to five pages. The content of your resume is very similar to a civilian resume, but will provide much more detail.
  2. Tweak your resume to match the job announcement. Just as you would for a private sector position, it’s important to keyword match and ensure that you emphasize that you are a solid fit for the position.
  3. Give detail, but be concise. It’s ok for your resume to run longer than a page because you are providing a much more extensive history of yourself, but do not let your accomplishment statements become so wordy that the hiring manager cannot interpret what you are getting at.
  4. Make absolutely sure that you are including all of the required information. Civilian resumes can be flexible in what you choose to include. However, a federal resume has different requirements for every resume, such as name, contact information, citizenship, educational history, and full employment information including hours worked per week.
  5. Proofread! Read over your resume multiple times to make sure there are no spelling, grammar, or punctuation errors.

To see more helpful tips from the Partnership for Public Service, check out Create Your Federal Resume and Federal Resume Writing Tips

From the Rio Olympics to Albright

As it gets colder and snowier, it’s easy to let your mind drift to warmer days full of sunshine. Some of us even daydream of the Rio Olympics- two weeks of sun, warm-weather sports, and temperatures that would definitely prevent snow. Abby Wolfe and Stacey Gawronski, both of The Muse, shared some insight on how we can incorporate lessons from the Rio Olympics into our everyday lives for success in the workplace or at school. Every student wants to do well in their classes, but it’s important to also take care of yourself in the process. Here are just a few of the suggestions that Wolfe and Gawronski provide:

  1. Get plenty of the right kind of sleep.  In other words, no all-nighters! Your body and mind won’t work effectively if they are deprived of the time they needs to restore themselves.
  2. Have confidence.  Clarify your goals for yourself, communicate them with others, and make your goals your focus.
  3. Take a break for fun.  There will be times when the to-do list seems daunting. Pencil some time into your schedule to get off campus, read a Buzzfeed article, or watch Carpool Karaoke. This will give your brain some time to relax and be ready to focus for your next round of studying.

There are many other ways we can emulate Olympic athletes to make sure we stay productive, such as finding ways to keep anxiety at bay, and eating healthy.  Learn tips from ten incredible athletes here: https://www.themuse.com/advice/10-olympic-athletes-daily-habits-you-should-steal-that-dont-involve-the-gym

Can Your Cover Letter REALLY Make Someone Smile?

We’ve discussed in previous posts about how cover letters can be TOUGH.  It’s hard to explain why you’re a perfect fit in a concise, personable manner- but still make sure it doesn’t come across as bragging. Moreover, it’s hard to make sure your cover letter stands out from the sea of dozens of other cover letters. To help you out, Jenny Foss of TheMuse explains what she looks for in a cover letter from a recruiter standpoint. By knowing what recruiters are looking for, it will be easier for you to make sure your cover letter will rise to the top of the pile!

  1. Give the company a specific reason why you are interested in them.  Everyone wants to feel special, and a representative of your dream company is no different. Like that they have a day of service each quarter? Let them know! Appreciate the outstanding service you’ve received from them? Tell them!
  2. Tell them exactly what you can deliver. Focus on key points of their candidate requirements, and explain how you have those qualifications. Let them know how you have used them in a professional setting.
  3. Make it personal by telling your story.  Add in a fun fact about yourself that may contribute to your career choice, or interest in that particular position or company.
  4. Address it to a real person. Yes, it’s tedious and can be hard to find exactly who will be reading your letter.  Let Google and LinkedIn be your friend and try to find the head of the department your position would be with, or at least someone related to hiring within HR.

It goes without saying that your cover letter should be well formatted, and free of grammar and spelling mistakes. It should be in formal language with no slang, text talk, or emojis. But most importantly, it should be a good representation of who you are- not a stuffy, overly-professional version of you. To get more insight from Ms. Foss, check out her entire article here: https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-cover-letters-that-make-hiring-managers-smile-then-call-you-1