Monthly Archives: February 2018

Abroad U: Getting Your Masters Degree Outside of the US

Going to graduate school is a huge decision. Determining where to go to graduate school is potentially an even bigger decision. There are lots of considerations – cost, location, program offerings, job prospects after graduation – it’s enough to make your head spin! As the world becomes more interconnected, more and more students are looking at international options to earn their masters degrees. As Liz Elfman from The Muse points out, there are plenty of “pros” for this option. Of course, there are a few “cons” to take into account, as well.

On the positive side, getting your degree abroad will really stand out to employers. You would get a ton of excellent professional skills, and the ability to give concrete examples of your global understanding. Plus, programs abroad are generally significantly cheaper, and have a shorter duration.

However, it’s important to keep in mind that the resources at the school will be geared toward their resident students, so it may be more difficult for you to find an internship or other opportunities to build your network. There also is a considerable learning curve as you adjust to not only being a graduate student, but a graduate student who isn’t native to that particular country!

Elfman outlines other things that she considered before she determined she was going to study abroad for graduate school. You can read her story here. What other things would you consider before determining where to go for graduate school?

Advertisements

Entry Level Job? Show Off Your Skills!

It’s no secret that employers have things they look for as they interview candidates and make their hiring decisions. Many of these key points they consider are skills that YOU probably already have! And if you don’t, that’s ok! They’re pretty easy to learn, and Albright has the resources to help you take on those new challenges. Emily Moore from Glassdoor wrote an article about the 14 skills needed for an entry-level position- so, what you should know when you’re ready to start Job One. She interviewed recruiters, business owners, and career counselors on the traits, skills, and experiences they value most.  Here are a few key points:

  1. Moore notes that “By far the most common skill mentioned by the HR and career experts we reached out to was the ability to communicate.” Not just speaking or giving presentations, but also professional writing – like emails – or listening.
  2. Don’t doubt your computer experience! Emphasize to employers your knowledge of Microsoft Office, social media, programming/web design, and Photoshop. You never know when that knowledge will be helpful.
  3. A positive attitude can really go a long way. Be open to learning new things, be flexible, and be cheerful!

You can read the entire article by clicking here. What other skills do you think are essential for an employee to have for their first job out of college?

Why Wawa (or Weis, or Walmart) Matters

“I don’t have any direct experience, I only make food at Wawa.”

“I’m just a cashier at Walmart, I don’t really do anything.”

“Weis is Weis. It’s not impressive, you know?”

Sound familiar? Many times, when meeting with a student, they get self-conscious or frustrated because they feel like they have nothing to offer an employer. But you know what, you have  A LOT to offer an employer! You just need to frame it in a different perspective.

When you make food at Wawa, you are preparing items to order in a timely manner. So you’re able to follow directions and work quickly.

When you are a cashier at Walmart, you need to be a responsible person and make sure your drawer is balanced. You also need to stay calm and professional when there’s a huge rush of customers.

When you work any role in a grocery store, you need to have a solid knowledge of where products are in the store, plus be able to give clear directions on how to find said products. All while providing friendly customer service.

All of these skills are important in the workplace, right? As you write your resume, don’t focus on your job title. Focus on the skills you gained from the experience, and how useful those skills will be to an employer fortunate enough to have you work for them!